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February 17, 2022 adminFertility

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has become extremely common, mainly due to poor lifestyle unhealthy eating habits and unawareness about the issues arising due to PCOS. These all add up to the noise level of PCOS.  Research has shown that Living with PCOS can increase the risks of type 2 diabetes, it can make you overweight and cause obesity and improving your lifestyle can help in reversing PCOS.

PCOS (Polycystic Ovary Syndrome) is a syndrome in which cysts form in the ovaries. Because the ovaries do not produce eggs or ovulation on a regular basis, it causes irregular periods. High levels of male hormones are released in the body as a result of the illness, which can lead to excessive facial or body hair. The ovaries enlarge and become filled with fluid sacs called follicles, which enclose the eggs. You’re much more likely to be diagnosed with PCOS if you have two of these characteristics. PCOS also puts you at risk for unexpected weight gain and hormone imbalance.

PCOS, according to gynaecologists, nutritionists, and health professionals, is mostly a lifestyle-related condition. PCOS can be caused by a lack of exercise, bad eating habits, smoking, alcohol misuse, and poor sleep.

Let’s go through some of the early warning signs of PCOS so you can take the necessary steps to control and reverse it.

  • Without a doubt, irregular periods are the first indication of PCOS. It might be an indication of PCOS if your menstrual cycle is irregular, with periods that arrive earlier than 21 days and later than 35 days in adults and 45 days in young teenagers. PCOS can also manifest itself in the inability to conceive. If you’ve been trying for a long period of time, getting yourself diagnosed with it could be a good idea.
  • If you have oily skin or a lot of acne all of a sudden, it might be one of the first signs of PCOS that you should pay attention to.
  • Hair thinning and loss are other signs of PCOS and should be treated carefully if they continue for an incredibly long time.
  • Living with PCOS can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes – a condition that causes higher than normal levels of blood sugar.
  • Mood swings and depression are also known to be risk factors for PCOS. If you neglect PCOS for a long period, it can lead to hormonal changes and depression that are hard to manage. It can significantly lower your self-confidence and self-esteem.
  • PCOS is associated with high blood pressure and cholesterol. Heart disease and stroke can be caused by certain disorders.
  • PCOS can cause you to gain weight, which can lead to sleep apnea, a disease in which you stop breathing while sleeping.
  • Endometrial cancer, or cancer of the uterine lining, is a risk for women who have irregular or infrequent periods – less than 3 to 4 per year – for many years.
  • Skin darkening. Under your arms or breasts, on the back of your neck, and in your genital area, you may notice thick, dark, velvety patches of skin. Acanthosis nigricans is the name for this disorder.
  • The high levels of hormones that cause PCOS can also cause headaches.

Wiser way to control the PCOS:

It may be possible to control your symptoms by eating the right foods and avoiding certain ingredients. A healthy diet can help in the regulation of your hormones and menstrual cycle. Eating processed, extensively preserved foods can increase inflammation and insulin resistance.

  • It’s all about whole foods: Artificial sugars, hormones, and preservatives are not found in whole foods. These foods are as close as possible to their original, unprocessed condition. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes are examples of whole foods that may be included in your diet. Your endocrine system may better manage your blood sugar without hormones and preservatives.
  • Balance carb and protein intake: Both carbs and protein have an effect on your energy and hormone levels. Protein stimulates the production of insulin in the body. Source foods are unprocessed and can help with insulin sensitivity. Rather of trying a low-carb diet, concentrate on eating enough high-quality protein. Plant-based protein sources, such as nuts, legumes, and whole grains, are the best Source. Anti-inflammatory foods should be included in your diet to help alleviate your symptoms. Consider going on a Mediterranean diet. Inflammation is treated by olive oil, tomatoes, leafy greens, fatty fish like mackerel and tuna, and tree nuts. Add magnesium in diet by using Almonds, cashews, spinach, and bananas. These are PCOS-friendly foods rich in magnesium & offer excellent stress reducer. Add in some fibre to help with digestion, a diet high in fibre can help improve your digestion. Lentils, lima beans, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, pears, and avocados are all rich in fibre and help in weight reduction.
  • Maintain a healthy weight: Maintaining a healthy weight can help you reduce insulin resistance, regulate your menstruation, and lower your risk of PCOS-related disorders. If you’re overweight, several studies show that a low-calorie diet combined with progressive weight loss is an effective first-line therapy for PCOS.
  • Balance your exercise: Maintaining a healthy weight requires regular exercise. However, too much exercise can cause hormonal imbalances, so talk to your doctor about maintaining a healthy balance. Gentle, low-impact exercises like yoga or Pilates can be practised for longer durations. Swimming and light aerobics are also recommended. High-intensity interval training and long-distance running may help improve symptoms of PCOS. Consult your doctor to determine the best sort of exercise for you.
  • Practice good sleep hygiene: Sleep increases your stress levels and helps in the regulation of cortisol, which helps to keep your hormones in balance. But sleep disturbances are twice as common Source for women with PCOS. Aim for 8 to 10 hours of sleep every night to improve your sleep hygiene. Create a consistent bedtime routine. Always avoid stimulants and rich, fatty foods before bedtime.
  • Reduce stress: Reducing stress can regulate cortisol Many of the measures listed such as yoga, getting adequate sleep, and avoiding coffee, can help reduce stress.

Consult your doctor to determine the best comprehensive ways to manage PCOS and avoid long-term effects, since one-size-fits-all treatment does not work. Your gynaecologist must prepare a treatment plan that is unique to you.


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January 12, 2022 adminFertility

Fertility changes with age. In women, this is very conspicuous and the window period of fertility is much smaller than in men. Males & Females attain fertility with the onset of puberty. For girls, fertility begins with the onset of ovulation and menstruation and ceases with the onset of menopause. Women can no longer conceive naturally after menopause, according to common belief.

In today’s scenario, age-related infertility is more common due to various reasons. Many women prefer to concentrate on a career for financial security and wait until their 30s to begin their families. Women take care of themselves better, so are far healthier & more updated about information available.

In general, women’s reproductive potential declines as they age, and fertility usually ends 5 to 10 years before menopause.

SIGNIFICANCE OF OVULATION AND THE MENSTRUAL CYCLE IN FERTILITY

During their reproductive years, women have regular monthly menstrual periods because they ovulate regularly monthly. Eggs mature inside fluid-filled spheres in the ovaries – called “follicles.” When a woman has her period at the beginning of her menstrual cycle, a hormone released in the pituitary gland (located in the brain) promotes a number of follicles on both ovaries to develop faster. The pituitary hormone that stimulates the ovaries is named FSH (FSH). Normally, only one of those follicles will reach maturity and release an egg (ovulate); the remainder gradually will stop growing and degenerate. Pregnancy results if the egg gets fertilized and gets attached to the lining of the uterus. If pregnancy doesn’t occur, the endometrium is shed because conception hasn’t occurred and we say that the cycle has begun again.

In their early teens, girls often have irregular ovulation leading to irregular menstrual cycles, but by age 16 they ought to have established regular ovulation leading to regular periods. From 26 to 35 days, a woman’s periods will be regular until her late 30s or early 40s, when they will get shorter. As time passes, she is going to begin to skip ovulation leading to missed periods.

Ultimately, periods get prolonged or become infrequent until they cease completely. When a lady has not had a menstrual period for 1 full year, she is claimed to be in menopause. Fertility falls as women age due to natural, age-related changes in the ovaries. A woman is born with all of the egg-containing follicles in her ovaries that she will ever have, unlike men, who continue to produce sperm throughout their lives.

At birth, there are about one million follicles. By puberty – about 300,000. Only around 300 of the follicles left at puberty will be ovulated during the reproductive years. The majority of follicles are not used up by ovulation and are eventually lost due to atresia, a degenerative process that happens independently of a woman’s condition, such as pregnancy, normal periods, being on birth control pills, or being treated for infertility. Menopause appears to occur one year earlier in smokers than in non-smokers.

FERTILITY IN THE AGING FEMALE:

In her 20s, a woman’s reproductive years are at their maximum. Fertility gradually declines within the 30s, particularly after age 35. A healthy, fertile 30-year-old woman has a 20% chance of becoming pregnant each month she tries. That means that just 20 out of every 100 fertile 30-year-old women who try to conceive in one cycle will succeed, with the remaining 80 having to try again. By age 40, a woman’s chance is smaller than 5% per cycle, so fewer than 5 out of each 100 women are expected to achieve success monthly.

Women do not remain fertile until menopause. The average age for menopause is 47, but most women cannot have successful pregnancies in their mid-40s. These percentages are true for natural conception also as conception using fertility treatment, including in vitro fertilization (IVF).

Much misleading information is spread through the media, which often misinterprets the age impact and an attempt is made to make patients believe that fertility treatments such as IVF are the easiest way to get pregnant. The natural process of conception, as well as assisted techniques for pregnancy, are greatly affected by age. Great nutritional status, as well as the solid foundation of financial security, does not reverse the biological clock.

The success rate of infertility treatments is affected by a woman’s age. The age-related loss of female fertility happens because both the standard and therefore the number of eggs gradually decline.

FERTILITY IN THE AGING MALE:

Unlike a woman’s first reduction in fertility, a man’s sperm characteristics fall considerably later. Sperm quality deteriorates as men age, although it usually does not become a problem until a guy is in his 60s. Changes in fertility and sexual functioning do occur in men as they get older.

Despite these changes, the ability to father a child even in the 60s and 70s with a younger partner is possible

Men’s testes decrease and get softer as they age, and sperm morphology (shape) and motility (movement) tend to indicate no. There is a slightly higher risk of genetic defects of sperms, happening during DNA fragmentation.

Any illness like diabetes, BP adversely affect their sexual and reproductive function. Not all men, especially those who maintain their health over time, have major changes in reproductive or sexual functioning as they age.

Improved health status does not interfere with the natural age-related decline in fertility. It’s critical to realise that a woman’s fertility decreases as she ages due to the natural decrease in the amount of eggs left in her ovaries as she ages. This decline may happen much before most girls expect.

While addressing infertility age is the main contributing factor. There are other contributing factors like ovulation disorders, hormonal imbalances, tubal defects, varicocele, infection & uterine fibroids to name a few.


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